Funding attendant care in NSW

Funding attendant care in NSW

The principal sources of funding/programs for Attendant Care in NSW are:

  • Lifetime Care (Funder)
  • Ageing Disability and Home Care Community Community Support (Program)
  • Workers Compensation Insurance and Motor Vehicle Accident Insurance
  • National Disability Insurance Scheme

In July 2008, ADHC signed an Interagency Agreement with NSW Health, Housing NSW and Lifetime Care to improve access to services for people with an ABI.

 

Lifetime Care

Lifetime Care provides treatment, rehabilitation and attendant care services to people severely injured in motor accidents in NSW, regardless of who was at fault in the accident.

People who are eligible for the Scheme will have a spinal cord injury; moderate to severe brain injury; amputations; severe burns; or will be blind as a result of the accident.

The Scheme began for children under the age of 16 injured in motor accidents from 1 October 2006 and began for adults from 1 October 2007.

More information: Lifetime Care

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADHC Community Support Program

The Community Support Program (CSP) (PDF) provides portable, flexible and individualised funding for people with a physical or neurological disability who need significant and frequent personal care and supports to complete activities of daily living.

To be eligible for the Community Support Program (CSP) package, a person must:

  • be aged 16 to 64 years (at the time of application)
  • be a resident of NSW and an Australian citizen or have a permanent resident visa or a protected special category visa to live in Australia
  • have a permanent physical (often adult on-set) disability such as spinal cord injury, neurological degenerative condition, or acquired brain injury
  • have significant personal care support needs which require high levels of personal care supports in their everyday life.

CSP participants can choose their provider and are able to change providers. Providers need to work in partnership with participants to manage the supports.

More information: Family & Community Services Ageing, Disability & Home Care

 

Acquired Brain Injury

People with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) may require a range of supports in order to live in the community. ABI can include brain injury resulting from head trauma, stroke, hypoxia (lack of oxygen to the brain), infection (e.g. encephalitis), brain tumour and brain damage from drug and/or alcohol misuse.

In July 2008, ADHC signed an Interagency Agreement with NSW Health, Housing NSW and Lifetime Care and Support Authority to improve access to services for people with an ABI.

A new guide called the Care and Support Pathways for People with an Acquired Brain Injury - Referral and Service Options in NSW (PDF, large file >1MB) has been developed by the Interagency partners to assist clients, families and referrers to navigate the service system. The guide also provides comprehensive information about the service options for people with an ABI that are provided by all of the partner agencies.

Exploring new approaches for people with ABI is a priority for ADHC throughout Stronger Together. ADHC funds a number of Non-Government Organisations to provide information and referral, case management and brokerage for specialised interventions, in-home and accommodation support and community participation for people with an ABI.

How to access services

You can access services by contacting ADHC our Information, Referral and Intake Service in your region who can advise you on services for people with an ABI in your area.

In addition, the Care and Support Pathways for People with an Acquired Brain Injury - Referral and Service Options in NSW (PDF, large file >1MB) provides comprehensive information about the service options for people with an ABI provided by ADHC, NSW Health, Housing NSW, Lifetime Care and Support Authority and Corrective Services NSW. Services listed can be contacted directly using the information shown in the document.

More information: Family & Community Services Ageing, Disability & Home Care

 

 

Insurance

Workers compensation insurance

Workers compensation provides protection to workers and their employers in the event of a work related injury or disease. 

Through the workers compensation system, injured workers may have an entitlement to:

  • weekly payments
  • lump sums for permanent impairment (and pain and suffering where applicable)
  • payment of medical bills
  • provision of legal assistance to pursue a claim
  • intensive rehabilitation assistance.

When a worker is injured at work, the employer, injured worker, insurer and treatment provider have responsibilities to ensure that the injured worker is provided with benefits and assistance to recover and return to safe, durable work.

For further information NSW Government Workcover on: 

More information: NSW Government Workcover

Motor vehicle accident insurance

The MAA works with service providers and CTP insurers to promote injury and claims management practices that deliver the best possible health outcomes for people recovering from an injury sustained in a motor vehicle crash. If you, a friend or relative requires treatment or assistance to return to work and usual activities this information may help.

Access to treatment and understanding how to manage your injury will improve your sense of well being. Staying active and keeping up with your usual activities will also aid recovery.

Your family doctor or General Practitioner (GP) can help by making early referral to health professionals to provide treatment. If you need any help understanding how the scheme works or how to access treatment and services, call the Claims Advisory Service 1300 656 919.

For further information from the Motor Accident Authority about:

More information: NSW Motor Accidents Authority

Other forms of insurance

Accidents may have occurred where other forms of insurance are in place, e.g. public liability.

 

 

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

The NDIS supports people with a permanent and significant disability that affects their ability to take part in everyday activities.

The NDIS will work with you to identify supports you need to live your life. Supports may help you achieve goals in many aspects of your life, including independence, involvement in your community, education, employment and health and wellbeing.

The NDIS gives you more choice and control over how, when and where your supports are provided, and gives you certainty you will receive the support you need over your lifetime.

From 1 July 2013, the first stage of the Scheme rolled out in South Australia, Tasmania, the Barwon area of Victoria and the Hunter area in New South Wales. Western Australia, the ACT and the Northern Territory joined the launch in July 2014.

The NDIS is being rolled out across Australian and NDIS will continue to talk to people and providers in upcoming launch sites about what they need to do to prepare for the rollout of the scheme.

More information: National Disability Insurance Scheme