Finding the right provider and carers

Identifying service providers

You need to identify service providers in your area.

How you do this will be unique to your location.

NSW

In NSW Lifetime Care has a list of approved attendant care providers on their website. They have been selected for the quality of their service. 

So that you know which providers are likely to be able to meet your needs, the panel is organised into three groups based on each organisation's experience. Some of the providers have skills across all three types of services, and others specialise in one area. Some of the providers also offer registered nursing services.

For the regional areas of NSW that each attendant care provider covers refer to the Service Coverage Guide  (134kb).

If you are unsure which region of NSW you live in, a map of the regions of NSW is available at the following link to the NSW Department of Local Government website.

 

 

 

 

The right case manager

Deciding which case manager will be right for you depends on where you live and the type of service you need.

For some people, choosing a case manager with a strong clinical background working in a specific field of disability will be important. For others, it will be more important to select a case manager who is familiar with their local community, community services for people with disabilities, and/or specific aspects of community participation such as integrating into recreational activities, getting a job or becoming a volunteer.

The type of case management service you require may change over time.

Speak to case managers who offer services where you live to help you make your decision. You may also want to speak with your family, members of your treating team, or your LTCS coordinator.

You may like to ask potential case managers the following questions:

  • Tell me about your experience working with people with a similar disability to me.
  • What qualifications and experience do you have?
  • How long have you worked in my local community?
  • If you live a long way away from my community, how will you ensure I am linked to appropriate local community services?
  • What is your experience delivering case management under the Lifetime Care and Support Scheme?
  • What days of the week are you available?
  • Are there other clients or families who I can contact as referees?

The right service provider

Deciding which attendant care provider will be right for you depends on where you live and the type of service you need.

Speak to attendant care providers who offer services where you live to help you make your decision. You may also want to speak with your family, your doctor, members of your health team, or your LTC coordinator.

You may like to ask potential attendant care providers the following questions:

  • Tell me about your company and the experience it has? 
  • What qualifications and experience do your attendant care workers have? 
  • Do you have attendant care workers who are experienced working with people with similar needs to mine? 
  • What are your emergency procedures? For example what after hours contacts are available? 
  • Can you provide registered nursing services, e.g.: changing my catheter? 
  • How will I be involved in selecting the attendant care workers who will be working with me? 
  • What are the working hours? For example what is the latest or earliest time an attendant care worker can come to my home? 
  • If I, or a member of my family, have a problem with an attendant care worker, what should I do? 
  • How long will it take before the service starts? 
  • Are attendant care workers able to assist with shopping or leisure activities? 
  • Are there other clients or families who I can contact as referees?

 

The right worker

Deciding which worker will be right for you depends on where you live and the type of service you need.

When you are interviewing new attendant care workers some questions you might ask are:

  • Have you worked with other people with brain / spinal cord injury?
  • What are some of the practical skills you bring?
  • What are professional boundaries and why are they important?
  • If the attendant care work is not going well who would you contact?

Some thinks you might talk about are:

  • Your goals
  • What support you need to achieve your goals
  • What skills you need the worker to have to support you in working towards the goals
  • Your cultural background (and how if affects the way you and/or your family like to do things).
  • Other things the worker needs to know about you or your family to work with you in the best way possible.